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Research Briefs

 

The Center for School Counseling Outcome Research & Evaluation provides occasional research briefs that summarize the exemplary outcome research completed in the field of school counseling.

The Center uses these briefs to make research widely available and highlight the implications of the research for school counseling leadership and practice. 

To subscribe to our Research Brief Distribution list, please visit our Registration Page where you can also view research briefs from previous years.

Please feel free to copy and distribute the briefs.

Recent Outcome Research

 

CSCORE conducts an annual review of school counseling outcome research for the American Counseling Association (ACA) conference. Below are the yearly related research articles. To view the full presentations, see Research & Scholarship

2019 

Auslander, L. (2018). Building culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms: A case study in teacher and counselor                                        collaboration.  Journal of Ethnographic & Qualitative Research, 12(3).     

          PDF


Johnston, A. D., Midgett, A., Doumas, D. M., & Moody, S. (2018). A mixed methods evaluation of the “aged-up” STAC bullying                              bystander intervention for high school students. The Professional Counselor, 8(1), 73-87.

            PDF


Mendez, J. J., & Bauman, S. (2018). From migrant farmworkers to first generation Latina/o students: Factors predicting college                          outcomes for students participating in the College Assistance Migrant Program. The Review of Higher Education, 42(1), 173-                    208. 

          PDF

2018  

Lemberger, M. E., Carbonneau, K. J., Selig, J. P., & Bowers, H. (2018). The role of social–emotional mediators on middle school                          students’ academic growth as fostered by an evidence‐based intervention. Journal of Counseling & Development, 96(1), 27-                      40.

          PDF

Luke, M., & Goodrich, K. M. (2017). Assessing an LGBTQ responsive training intervention for school counselor trainees. Journal of                    Child and Adolescent Counseling, 3(2), 103-119.

Marine, S. B. (2017). Changing the frame: queering access to higher education for trans* students. International Journal of                                  Qualitative Studies in Education, 30(3), 217-233. doi:10.1080/09518398.2016.1268279

          PDF

Martinez, R. R., Baker, S. B., & Young, T. (2017). Promoting career and college readiness, aspirations, and self‐efficacy: Curriculum                    field test. The Career Development Quarterly, 65(2), 173-188.

            PDF

Mullen, P. R., & Crowe, A. (2017). Self‐stigma of mental illness and help seeking among school counselors. Journal of Counseling &                    Development, 95(4), 401-411.

            PDF

Sargent, K. S., Jouriles, E. N., Rosenfield, D., & McDonald, R. (2017). A high school-based evaluation of TakeCARE, a video                                    bystander program to prevent adolescent relationship violence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 46(3), 633-643.                                      doi:10.1007/s10964-016-0622-z

            PDF

Williams, J. M., Bryan, J., Morrison, S., & Scott, T. R. (2017). Protective factors and processes contributing to the academic success of                students living in poverty: Implications for counselors. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 45(3), 183-200.

            PDF

Winburn, A., Gilstrap, D., & Perryman, M. (2017). Treating the tiers: Play therapy responds to intervention in the schools.                                      International Journal of Play Therapy, 26(1), 1.

            PDF

2017 

Castleman, B. L., & Page, L. C. (2015). Summer nudging: Can personalized text messages and peer mentor outreach increase college                    going among low-income high school graduates? Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 115, 144-160.

            PDF

Harrington, K., Griffith, C., Gray, K., & Greenspan, S. (2016). A grant project to initiate school counselors' development of a multi-                      tiered system of supports based on social-emotional data. Professional Counselor, 6(3), 278-294.

            PDF

Masia Warner, C., Colognori, D., Brice, C., Herzig, K., Mufson, L., Lynch, C., . . . Moceri, D. C. (2016). Can school counselors deliver                    cognitive‐behavioral treatment for social anxiety effectively? A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Child Psychology and                    Psychiatry, 57(11), 1229-1238.

            PDF

Robinson, K. J., & Roksa, J. (2016). Counselors, information, and high school college-going culture: Inequalities in the college                              application process. Research in Higher Education, 57(7), 845-868.

            PDF

2015 

Beidas, R. S., Stewart, R. E., Walsh, L., Lucas, S., Downey, M. M., Jackson, K., . . . Mandell, D. S. (2015). Free, brief, and validated:                      Standardized instruments for low-resource mental health settings. Cognitive and behavioral practice, 22(1), 5-19.

            PDF

Castleman, B. L., Page, L. C., & Schooley, K. (2014). The forgotten summer: Does the offer of college counseling after high school                          mitigate summer melt among college‐intending, low‐income high school graduates? Journal of Policy Analysis and                                    Management, 33(2), 320-344.

            PDF

Sibley, M. H., Altszuler, A. R., Ross, J. M., Sanchez, F., Pelham Jr, W. E., & Gnagy, E. M. (2014). A parent-teen collaborative treatment              model for academically impaired high school students with ADHD. Cognitive and behavioral practice, 21(1), 32-42.

            PDF

2014 

Belasco, A. S. (2013). Creating college opportunity: School counselors and their influence on postsecondary enrollment. Research in                    Higher Education, 54(7), 781-804.

            PDF

Lee, J. H., Nam, S. K., Kim, A. R., Kim, B., Lee, M. Y., & Lee, S. M. (2013). Resilience: A meta‐analytic approach. Journal of                                  Counseling & Development, 91(3), 269-279.

            PDF

Rupani, P., Haughey, N., & Cooper, M. (2012). The impact of school-based counselling on young people's capacity to study and learn.                  British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 40(5), 499-514.

            PDF

2012 

Casillas, A., Robbins, S., Allen, J., Kuo, Y.-L., Hanson, M. A., & Schmeiser, C. (2012). Predicting early academic failure in high school                  from prior academic achievement, psychosocial characteristics, and behavior. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104(2), 407.

            PDF

Posthumus, J. A., Raaijmakers, M. A., Maassen, G. H., Van Engeland, H., & Matthys, W. (2012). Sustained effects of Incredible Years                  as a preventive intervention in preschool children with conduct problems. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40(4), 487-                  500.

            PDF

Webster-Stratton, C. H., Reid, M. J., & Beauchaine, T. (2011). Combining parent and child training for young children with ADHD.                      Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 40(2), 191-203.

            PDF

 

Evidence-Based Interventions

Dimmit, C., Carey, J., & Hatch, T. (2007). Evidence-Based school counseling: Making a difference with data-driven                                           practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

         Purchase

Knapp, S. E., Jongsma Jr, A. E., & Dimmitt, C. L. (2014). The school counseling and school social work treatment planner, with DSM-           5 updates. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

         Purchase

Dimmitt, C., Zyromski, B., Griffith, C. (2019) Identifying evidence-based school counseling interventions. Presented at the                                  Evidence-Based School Counseling Conference, Columbus, OH

          Presentation

Instruments

 

SCARS: School Counselor Rating Activity Scale

The School Counselor Activity Rating Scale (SCARS) was developed to aid school counselors in the gathering of data about how school counselors actually spend their time and what job-related activities they would prefer to spend their time doing. Individual activities or the major interventions of a comprehensive developmental school counseling program (Counseling, Consultation, Curriculum, Coordination) may be examined. In addition, “other duties” commonly performed by school counselors may also be assessed. For information on instrument development and validity please see:

Scarborough, J. L. (2005). The School Counselor Activity Rating Scale: An instrument for gathering process data. Professional School Counseling, 8,3. 274-283.

The information obtained on the SCARS can be utilized in a variety of ways including:

  • As part of an overall program evaluation report

  • As a means to educate constituents about the role and functions of school counselors

  • As a method for educating school counselors-in-training about school counseling activities and how to approach differences between “ideal” and “reality”

  • To gather data in a research project designed to further understand variables related to school counselor practice or interventions designed to move school counselor practice to be more aligned with best practices

School counseling professionals have used SCARS as they:

  • Work to implement comprehensive school counseling programs in school districts

  • Conduct research examining teacher perceptions of school counselor effectiveness compared with school counselor performance

  • Attempt to advocate for adding a full-time school counseling position

  • Fulfill a request by the school administrator to conduct a task analysis

  • Conduct research examining the impact of supervision on school counselor self-efficacy and the school counselor’s work day

  • Prepare to speak to the school board about moving their high school program toward a comprehensive developmental school counseling program

  • Collect data to support the revision of a school guidance plan

You are welcome to use the School Counselor Activity Rating Scale. Simply print the 2-page PDF document and copy into a two-sided pamphlet for your convenience. Download the SCARS by clicking here – the SCARS is available as a two page PDF file, and is designed to be printed on both sides of a single page and folded in half.

Janna Scarborough developed the instrument, and she is interested in hearing about how you use the instrument and any results that you find. She can be contacted at scarboro@etsu.edu.

School Counseling Program Implementation Survey 

The School Counseling Program Implementation Survey was developed by Dave Elsner and John Carey to help schools conduct a quick audit of their program. With only 18 questions, the survey helps identify key areas of comprehensive school counseling program implementation. Initial reliability analyses on the instrument reveal that the survey has good psychometric properties.

SCPIS – Word document containing the School Counseling Program Implementation Survey

Christopher Sink's List of Measurements & Assessments

Christopher Sink, Ph.D., professor at Old Dominion University, maintains a website cataloging free, validated, social-emotional learning instruments. 

American School Counselor Association Readiness Survey

The ASCA Readiness Survey is a tool designed to help you assess your district’s readiness to implement the ASCA National Model and to determine what you will need to achieve successful implementation.

Surveys for Program Evaluation and Review

Administrator                      

    - Elementary           

​    - Middle                      

    - High                               

    - K-8     

 

Counselor     

    - Elementary

    - Middle

    - High

    - K-8     

 

Teacher

    - Elementary

    - Middle

    - High

    - K-8

Student

    - High 

 

Parent

    - Elementary

    - Elementary Spanish

    - Middle

    - Middle Spanish

    - High

    - High Spanish

    - K-8

    - K-8 Spanish

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